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Search & Tonic for June 22, 2012

by
Jen Salamandick
The Industry

by Jen Salamandick

Welcome to Search & Tonic, where we like our links the same way we like our drinks; strong. Each Friday we will present links from the past week that wowed us, offered a unique opinion, or taught us something brand new.

First off, (and completely lacking in relevance to SEO), I scored an impressive goal at ball hockey last night and that was so exciting for me that I completely forgot about the offside rule for the rest of the game. Tragic!

Covered this week: Getting feedback from users, Do more work by goofing off, Changes to Facebook advertising, and a no laptop sign in a coffee shop.

The Secret to Getting Great Feedback From Your Users

KISSmetrics shares a simple system the company has been using to garner feedback from users – and reports 3,200 forms filled out since February 2011. This idea of having a simple question with an answer box at the bottom of a page seems perfect to me because it is not disruptive to the user. However, I don’t see myself ever filling one out.

I realized that I have never reviewed any online tool or website before. I write restaurant reviews, and brick-and-mortar store reviews all the time, but I’ve never reviewed a page, an app, or a tool before. Weird, maybe I’ll start by writing a review about how Draw Something won’t let me get past 100 rounds with anyone.

The article points out the downsides of App Chat Windows, and I agree times a million. There is something about those chat conversations that bring out the absolute worst in me. I get so impatient. One time I typed, “It surprises me that a person who types slower than my Grandma was hired to fill this position.” And when I am not satisfied with the outcome, I’ll end with a childish, “Thanks for nothing sucka!”

8 Ways Goofing Off Can Make You More Productive

Last week Dana gave me a book about productivity, but I was being unproductive in New York for most of last week/this weekend so I haven’t read it yet. Now that I’ve read this eight-point list, maybe I don’t even need to read her book! I feel unproductive when it takes me a too long to write a single sentence, or when I notice that I have ten Buzzfeed tabs open, or when I realize that I have conversations open on Skype, Gchat, and FB Chat. So generally the key to making myself more productive is stopping the things I am doing that are unproductive and then carrying on with work.

The eighth point, about going out for lunch, is imperative because when I let myself get too hungry it’s like the line between productive and unproductive gets really blurry and then it is so hard to pull myself out of the YouTube video spiral. Going out for lunch can also be dangerous because sometimes lunches get really long and when you start flirting with three o’clock it is really hard to get back into the game after that.

Real-Time Facebook Advertising

There’s a new bidding process for Facebook advertising, and it is designed to help advertisers deliver their messages in a more time sensitive manner. The article uses a real example of an apparel company being able to post ads for either the Heat or the Thunder depending on the outcome of a game. Think whatever you want about my refusal to link to the Miami Heat.

From the article: “With Facebook Exchange, marketers will be able to target people who have perused certain kinds of websites in the past based on cookies, or small pieces of code, that can track activities on the Web. For example, users who have visited travel sites to research trips to Hawaii may later see a promotion on Facebook about hotels in Hawaii.”

This feels invasive. Changing my relationship status on Facebook has led to significant changes to the ads I see. After I got engaged it was all wedding photography, flower arrangements, and other fluffy white bridal junk. Then as soon as I got married it switched to baby clothes, zumba classes, and kitchenwares.

No Laptops at This Table Please

I was in New York from Thursday – Monday, staying with friends in Brooklyn. I’d heard so much about this coffee shop before setting foot inside it that it didn’t feel like my first time stepping through the door. The iced coffee (cold drip) was amazing. The best I’ve ever had. I also had approximately 14 bagels and a banana muffin that tasted like a Grandma had crafted it specifically for me. The grilled turkey / red pepper sandwich I had would have been excellent, had my request for no dijon been granted. Alas, that rank dijon flavour permeated the turkey, the bun, and my soul.

The perfect iced coffee aside, what struck me most about the Hungry Ghost was the signs on most of the tables stating that laptops were not allowed. The only place they can be used was at five or six bar seats that face a wall, and at one small table on that same side. I assumed that this was one of those rules that was actually more of a suggestion and therefore would never really be enforced, but I was wrong. I had the pleasure of seeing an escalating confrontation between the owner/manager and two patrons, a couple, who apparently had no desire to speak to each other and wanted to use their laptops at a no laptop table. This did not fly. They trudged to the bar seating and probably checked their Facebook pages and then hightailed it outta there.

Is this a common thing? Has anyone else seen no laptop signs at a coffee shop?

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