Reporting

Anyone can go into Google Analytics and print reports. You can even get them sent to your email in whatever frequency you choose. When you look at those reports you see an orange line, a blue line, and a few rows/columns of numbers. If you’re working with an SEO agency that touts keyword rankings as the end-all-be-all, you’ll see a list of keywords and some directional arrows too, likely decked out in happy green or sad red.

The problem with a report like this is that the metrics being tracked are often not the ones that matter most. Additionally, without commentary and insights, how will you make the red turn green next month? And how will you make the green greener?

When we start an ongoing relationship with a client, a large part of our first meeting will be learning about the type of reporting is needed. Your business goals will be integral in informing how we develop your reports, because our insights and recommendations must be tailored to what you want to get out of your marketing efforts.

Unfortunately, a lot of reporting in our industry is simply not adequate. Please consider the following two scenes.

Scene One

Wherein the marketing manager of a small plastic surgery office discusses a report from an SEO company with the CEO:

Marketing Manager: "Here's the latest report from our SEO agency. Some of our keywords went down it seems, but some went up as well, so I think we're good."

CEO: "What is this mess? Why aren't we number one for rhinoplasty?"

Marketing Manager: "Oh uhhm, geez, I don't know. This note here says that [retracted] is gonna upweight the focus on rhinoplasty."

CEO: "Why aren't we number one for rhinoplasty?"

Marketing Manager: "Uhhhhmm..."

Scene Two

Wherein the marketing manager of a small plastic surgery office discusses a report from Kick Point with the CEO:

Marketing Manager: "I just had a great phone call with our digital agency — let's go over the highlights of this report."

CEO: "Hit me."

Marketing Manager: "Well, they discovered that we get the most inquires that turn into booked appointments from people who first see us on Facebook and then go to the nose job before/after page. So next month we are shifting some of the PPC budget from AdWords to Facebook to take advantage of that."

CEO: "Okay, sounds fine. Wait, why in the heck aren't we coming up number one for rhinoplasty?"

Marketing Manager: "Ah well, that's because no one looking for rhinoplasty surgery searches for it. They search for nose job instead."

CEO: "Hm, wow, that actually makes sense, not many people that I didn't go to school with ever say the word rhinoplasty to me."

Marketing Manager: "Exactly. I'm going to go through the rest of the site too, to make sure we aren't throwing doctor jargon around anywhere else."

Which scene do you want to be a part of? If Part Two is what you want, let’s talk.